Recent entries

    Children of the Nameless Reddit AMA ()
    #101 Copy

    _i_am_root

    Mr Sanderson, you have been a very active member in the communities about your books, and still manage to create such quality stories.

    My question is, what has been the most memorable interaction you have had with a fan?

    PS. Back when I first started reading your books, I sent you an email, and I got a reply. I just want to tell you how much that meant to me 5 years ago, no other author had ever responded to my emails, and I just want to say thank you.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Actually, the most memorable is probably when I saw someone on Reddit wishing they could be in the Stormlight Archive. (I believe it's /u/Kaladin_Stormblessed.) Well, I found her a spot in the books, and it turns out she is very involved in fandom and is a writer herself, so the two of us have become friends over the years. To the point that I forget we first met over a random thread on the internet.

    You might also count the fact that a pair of fans, who met at one of my signings, eventually got engaged via a proposal that happened at one of my lectures. (With my involvement.)

    Anyway, I'm glad I was able to answer that email! I don't get to do much of that any more, and a lot of people get form mail or responses from Adam instead. (It just got to be too much for me.)

    Children of the Nameless Reddit AMA ()
    #102 Copy

    cantoXV1

    Did you struggle with the limits of the magic world and magic system since you're so used to creating your own?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I worried about this a lot when going into the Wheel of Time--but I found that I really like taking an established magic system and pushing it this direction or that direction. It's a lot of fun to me to dig into how something works, and see if I can "break" it in interesting ways.

    I suspected I'd have a similar experience with MTG, and I did--though I did need something I could play with to be unique. I settled on the kind of "Gonti/Nightveil Specter" ability to steal spells from someone else, then use them yourself. This was a really fun space for me to play with, and I found it thoroughly engaging.

    Children of the Nameless Reddit AMA ()
    #103 Copy

    cantoXV1

    Brandon, how was character creation different for Children of the Nameless compared to the rest of your other works?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Character creation wasn't that different--I start usually with a conflict or a theme. For Davriel, it was "Economist gets magical powers" mixed with "Person who uses contracts with demons not for crazy power, but to get good staff members."

    For Tacenda, I was looking at her curse and the way she uses music. (Mixed with the conflict of being able to hear your entire village get killed--but not being able to stop it.)

    From there, I did apply some MTG philosophy to the refinement of the characters.

    Children of the Nameless Reddit AMA ()
    #104 Copy

    Nallebjurn

    Is it a possibility that we in the future get to see the characters from Children of the Nameless represented on magic cards?

    Brandon Sanderson

    It is a possibility, but as the other responder mentioned, I don't have any control over this--I think it's likely, but I certainly couldn't say when. I think the fact that Dack got a card--after being created by the comic book team--bodes well for Davriel, at the very least.

    Children of the Nameless Reddit AMA ()
    #106 Copy

    Arkm21ebr

    Are there any MtG planes that have had an influence on you and share some characteristics with any of the planets in the cosmere?

    Brandon Sanderson

    It's hard to say how much influence MTG has had on me, since I started playing in high school--right around the time when I started writing. I don't ever remember seeing the connected shared worlds thing, and connecting it to the cosmere. (I see that as more directly influenced by Asimov and Stephen King connecting their books together) but it's totally possible that MTG was an unconscious influence.

    Children of the Nameless Reddit AMA ()
    #107 Copy

    Jovh

    What challenges are there in writing for an already established IP vs something of your own creation?

    Brandon Sanderson

    The biggest challenge is always the push and pull between what the larger story needs vs. the little story I want to tell. For example, MTG has established rules about what the planeswalkers can do--and it's important to stay in canon for the greater good of the story. (Planeswalkers, for example, can't take people with them when they hop between worlds.) That limits me, for example, if I wanted to do Davriel on another plane--he couldn't take any supporting cast with him.

    That's a rule you probably wouldn't set up if this were just stories about Davriel, as the supporting cast is what makes him shine as a character. But the structure of it is important for not breaking the larger stories the team is telling.

    Children of the Nameless Reddit AMA ()
    #108 Copy

    mbue

    1. Did you get to choose Innistrad as the setting, or was that something that was already part of the planeswalker WotC had in mind that your character got merged into?
    2. How many MtG novels have you read yourself?
    3. I understand that your novella will stand very well on its own, but I'm sure there will be references to existing lore. Could you point out any existing MtG novels that would particularly increase our understanding and enjoyment of some details in yours?

    Brandon Sanderson

    1. I got to choose. I had built Davriel most of the way when they said, "Hey, we've got this blank slate planeswalker in our files. Do you want to make this your character?" It worked perfectly, as it let me fill out the lore for this person and have them work as part of the larger narrative.

    2. Not a ton. I've read a lot of the more recent web-based fiction. I bought the early novels to get the sweet promo cards, and remember liking them--but it's been a while. Otherwise, little spots here and there. (I particularly liked the comics.)

    3. Davriel is partially a contrast to Liliana, a main-line character who also has had dealings with demons (but has done it much differently...) and who is a necromancer (exactly of the sort Davriel would hate.) I think reading about her might make for a fun contrast. She's heavily involved in the previous Innistrad story, which you might enjoy if you liked this one. You can find it on Wizards site: https://magic.wizards.com/en/content/shadows-over-innistrad-story

    Children of the Nameless Reddit AMA ()
    #109 Copy

    MagisterSieran

    How would you compare writing this novella to the Wheel of Time books you wrote? Both have treasure troves of existing lore and characters and both are fantasy media that you're a fan of.

    Brandon Sanderson

    It was a similar experience in some ways--I had a lot of creative freedom in both cases, for example, and I had a lot of lore to draw upon.

    For the WoT, though, I was very, very steeped in the lore--and made sure I did another deep dive before writing the stories. Here, I have familiarity with a lot of MTG lore, but there's a lot I don't know. I haven't read most of the fiction, particularly the older fiction, for example.

    So for WoT I felt confident taking main storylines and resolving them, while for this, I tried to create my own sort of sectioned-off part of the plane to play in. Then I created my own lore for that area that I could control more specifically--traditions and lore that were related to the well-known places on Innistrad, but not exactly the same. That way, I could play with them, and undermine them, and do what I wished with them.

    Children of the Nameless Reddit AMA ()
    #110 Copy

    Aurimus_

    As a worldbuilder, I love digging into worlds I wouldn't experience otherwise - DnD setting guides, wikis and the like. From the chapter released on io9 already, and what I've seen on various reddits discussing your novella, it feels like MtG has a massive world behind it too (someone described MtG as very similar to the Cosmere?)

    First off, will your novella be suitable for someone like me who has never actually dug into the MtG lore before? And secondly, where would you say a Cosmere fan should begin digging into the lore here? What are your favorite worldbuilding elements? Have any inspired elements in your stories? (Cosmere or otherwise)

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes, this novella will be suitable for someone who knows nothing about the lore. I wrote it expecting most wouldn't know anything about it.

    If you want to dig into MTG lore, the various MTG wikis talk a lot about the world and lore--but you could do worse than just reading the other stories on Wizard's website, as a lot of them are well done.

    My favorite MTG worldbuilding elements tend to be their visual worldbuilding--they have a lot of artists, and much of what they come up with is beautiful. It's a lot of fun to just go to Gatherer (the website with all the archive of cards) and pick a Set (like Innistrad) and read the flavor text at the bottom of the cards. (They are quotes or things in-world. Not every card has them, but much do.) That, with the art style, can tell you an entire story on its own.

    I've been playing MTG since I was in high school, so I'd say my writing was probably influenced by it a lot--but I don't know if I can name any specifics.

    Children of the Nameless Reddit AMA ()
    #111 Copy

    Use_the_Falchion

    I'm not a MTG fan by any stretch, (I've played a couple of rounds with friends, but it usually takes some heavy coercing) but if I wanted to become one, especially for the lore, where would I start?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Well, this story isn't a bad place, since I wrote it hopefully in a way that will be interesting to those who don't know any of the lore. Otherwise, the soft reboot mentioned below is a good place.

    I liked a number of the earlier comic books (though I haven't read the current one) and thought they were well done. I also liked the work Martha Wells did recently--I linked it in my blog post today.

    For years, each Magic story was isolated, with each set having its own story. (Save for one long arc near the beginning.) Some ten years ago, they decided to create a group of people who would travel between the worlds, and let the story center on their interaction with the locations--which gave it some stronger continuity. The soft reboot at Origins (which is kind of the second soft reboot for MTG) is the start of the current larger arc.

    Children of the Nameless Reddit AMA ()
    #112 Copy

    Dwarven_Hydra

    What was it like keeping this project a secret for so long, especially with so many people guessing it’d turn out to be exactly this?

    Brandon Sanderson

    So, it did grow kind of annoying to keep this secret--as I tend to be the type to think that a secret doesn't do a project like this very much good. The longer a project remains a (known) secret, the bigger the hype machine--and I knew pretty early on that people were going to blow this out of proportion.

    So I hope it wasn't too much of a disappointment that it wasn't some huge film or video game project, like I suspect some of you were expecting. Fortunately, I've had secret projects before, and they tend to be novellas like this.

    Either way, I do wish they'd let me announce it sooner. Not sure exactly why they wanted to keep it a secret. Announcing it in July and letting people anticipate would have been great for building interest--but I think they were a little wary since they really didn't know how big it would be or what it would be like, since they didn't commission the piece so much as say 'yes' then try to ride the wave that is Brandon creating a story.

    General Reddit 2018 ()
    #114 Copy

    Scrimshaw13

    Any word on whether [Children of the Nameless will] be coming out in physical form? Just curious. I know for a while the M:TG books were eBook exclusive and the story has been website-exclusive but they're also gearing up to start publishing physical books again next year so...haha.

    Brandon Sanderson

    There's a pretty good chance of this, but it will be a while. Maybe late next year?

    General Reddit 2018 ()
    #115 Copy

    AvatarofSleep

    Some years ago I met you at a reading at Borderlands SF and asked if you'd ever write for MTG. If I may follow up -- why the change of heart? Was this a one off thing or will we see more things in the future?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I can't remember what point you asked me, but it might have been when I was feeling particularly overwhelmed by my work load. This hit me right when I had enough space in my schedule, and they also were willing to let me do whatever I wanted with it. So it all came together!

    This is intended to be a one-off. I'm not closing the door on doing more in the future, but the stars would have to align in the right way again.

    General Reddit 2018 ()
    #116 Copy

    trimeta

    Is Children of the Nameless accessible to readers who know absolutely nothing about the Magic: the Gathering world(s) and mythos? Are there any core concepts we should be familiar with before reading?

    Brandon Sanderson

    My goal was to treat this story so you could pick it up never having read anything about (or ever played) Magic. Judging by my writing group's reactions (few of them are familiar with it) this worked.

    That said, I jump right into the story, rather than doing a big lore catch-up session, so there might be aspects that are a little confusing here and there.

    General Reddit 2018 ()
    #117 Copy

    CarterLawler

    Rock is the cook for Bridge 4, and not once does he say, "Can you smell what the Rock is cooking?" It is a missed opportunity

    I have to wonder if /u/mistborn had that mind when creating the character. I will only see him that way now!

    Ankylosaurian

    Unfortunately not.

    bonly

    I don't believe it. To clarify, I believe he didn't intentionally do it and I 100% believe Brandon is telling the subjective truth.

    On the other hand, he invented a fictional culture loosely based on Polynesians and then made a big strong character from that culture and gave him the same name as a big strong descendant of Polynesians.

    Have to stress, I'm in no way saying any of this as a negative thing...but the conscious part of the human brain isn't always aware of everything the rest of the brain is doing or where its thoughts come from.

    Brandon Sanderson

    I can see how you'd be skeptical...but you can find Rock in the 1998/99 version of Dragonsteel. He's largely the same character with the same name--though this was before he and Bridge Four were moved to the Stormlight Archive. Regardless, Dragonsteel was printed as my honors thesis several years before I even heard of the wrestler/actor. This really is just a coincidence. Sorry, /u/CarterLawler.

    General Reddit 2018 ()
    #118 Copy

    kastorslump

    [An image of all of Brandon's progress bars at 100%] well i guess that's it then, no more books ever

    Brandon Sanderson

    I've actually been doing a number of small things, as opposed to one big one, like /u/pm_me_your_ide guessed. Basically, I'm trying to clear my desk of small projects in preparation for launching into Stormlight 4 in January.

    These little things involved a final draft of Secret Project (which I can't announce yet--but you'll know about it soon.) Working on an audio-original novella I've been writing with a friend. Signing large mountains of books for holiday orders. Tinkering with Apocalypse Guard, which I still hope to release some day. Filling out the Skyward 3 outline. None of these really deserved a progress bar, as none of them took more than a week or so.

    I will post details in the State of the Sanderson in three weeks or so.

    General Reddit 2018 ()
    #119 Copy

    Amaowin

    So men cannot write, it is a feminine art. Women do all the writing and reading while also covering their left hand with a sensible long sleeve (not godless whores). But what if a proper Vorin woman is born left-handed? Would she be forced to wear a glove in order to write? Or would she do her best to write with her right hand to avoid her sinful nature as a lefty? I wonder if these women write in secret, away from the lecherous eyes of others, and expose her safe hand to write freely.

    These thoughts keep me up at night. I pity these left-handed Vorins for the rough life they must live.

    Brandon Sanderson

    This isn't as big a deal as you might think, because for a lot of the population, they just wear a glove and use their left hand.

    It gets interesting when you are upper class, female, and left-handed. Part of the inspiration for the safehand was the way that the left hand is regarded as unclean in some of our cultures on Earth. You might be curious to read about what left-handed people did, historically, in some middle eastern cultures.

    The short answer is "They learn to be ambidextrous" but the long answer is that it can be quite a pain, and very embarrassing. So yes, you are right to feel sorry for those left-handed Vorin women.

    General Reddit 2018 ()
    #122 Copy

    il_vekkio

    I'm currently reading New Spring after finishing, and going BACK to Jordan after /u/mistborn absolutely killed The Last Battle...it's interesting. Sanderson really did breathe new life into the series. I'm particularly impressed by how he took the rules of one of the most intricate magic systems I've ever seen and turned them in their head and got insanely creative with them. Particularly Talmanes and Aludra using traveling while operating the dragons. Fantastic out of the box thinking.

    Also, Talmanes is hands down the best side character who is so overshadowed by the main five heroes that it's easy to forget about him. But damn it he my favorite example of peak human bravery. Not ta'veren, not one of the great generals, not the world's most skilled swordsman. But time and time again he overcomes every obstacle, accomplishing the impossible. If it wasn't a recoming of the Age of Legends with heroes abound, he'd be the main hero.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Talmanes is one of those characters that I was very excited to write--though I anticipated my take on him being more controversial than it ended up being. I've always read him a certain way, and felt that I wanted to push him that direction in the last books--all the while knowing that some members of fandom didn't view him as I did. One of the dangers of bringing a fan like myself to write the books is that is had specific and distinct interpretations of some of the characters, particularly some of the side characters who were going to get expanded roles.

    il_vekkio

    The way I read Talmanes was as a sort of "You've got to be kidding me" John McClane. A capable man who doesn't want to be there, but he's there and there's only one way out.

    I'd be very interested to hear how your vision for him differed from the final character!

    Brandon Sanderson

    That is how I read him too--but also with a hint of self-awareness. Like when he'd say things to Mat, he wasn't always 100% serious, but sometimes kind of pushing Mat's buttons. That's the part I figured would be controversial, since I knew some other fans read him as straight serious.

    Skyward Houston signing ()
    #123 Copy

    Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

    How did you get the idea for The Rithmatist?

    Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

    The Rithmatist started with the drawings. I did the little doodles first, of all the fences and things. And I just started drawing and drawing and drawing. And I drew all those out, and I thought, "Okay, I'm gonna write a book around this idea." I wanted to do something where people played a sport with magic, rather than only using it for, like, war and things.

    Skyward Houston signing ()
    #124 Copy

    Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

    You've mentioned before that your conclusions, you like to have people figure it out, like, a paragraph right before it happens. Which one do you think you executed best?

    Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

    Oh, man. I am not sure. It's tricky, because it's getting harder and harder to fool the readers as they get wiser and wiser to my things, so at some point, I just have to be okay with that. So I think that the early books, I was able to pull off more. Like, the Mistborn One ending is probably the one that gets people the best. I think I'm getting better at my climaxes, but now that people are getting wise to me, I have to convolute them a little bit more. Like, the Oathbringer one, people were probably expecting from Book One. They have multiple books to...

    Skyward Houston signing ()
    #125 Copy

    Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

    What gave you the idea to write the Alcatraz books?

    Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

    You know, it was the first line. I was just doodline in a notebook one day, and I wrote down, "So there I was, tied to an altar made of outdated encyclopedias, about to be sacrificed to the dark powers by a cult of evil librarians." And I had to write that book. So I just kind of took that line, and I ran with it.

    Skyward Houston signing ()
    #127 Copy

    Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

    What inspired you write Way of Kings? Was that your first one?

    Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

    That was not my first one. It's different... there are lots of different ideas that usually come together to make one book. And Way of Kings is lots of different ideas. One of them was wanting to tell a story about a world where the highstorm, where the magic storm hit periodically. Something you guys kind of know a little bit about here. The idea of how life would have to adapt to a storm. But there are lots of different ideas that come together.

    Skyward Houston signing ()
    #128 Copy

    Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

    On Skyward, I love the Graphic Audio adaptations. Do you know if there's any plans to do a Graphic Audio recording on Skyward at this time?

    Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

    There's not plans right now. I'm trying to talk Random House into it. I guess it would be Audible into it, 'cause they have the audio rights. They haven't let us do the Reckoners. It's tough because Audible bought the rights directly, and Graphic Audio is a direct competitor. Whereas with the Stormlight books, MacMillian audio is not the same. So, we'll try.

    Skyward Houston signing ()
    #129 Copy

    Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

    Will we see Aether of Night eventually?

    Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

    I can't promise. You've seen the aethers; Mraize's room of trophies. But I can't absolutely promise I'll work it in. The question is, if I find the time. I just stay consistent on the mainline Cosmere books. If I find the time, I'll get Aether of Night.

    Skyward Houston signing ()
    #130 Copy

    Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

    Do you have a giant timeline somewhere written out all of it?

    Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

    I do. Actually, it's in a wiki. I work digitally for most of my stuff. It's one that myself and my assistants use to try and keep everything straight. Actually, Karen, who this book is dedicated to, her main job is to do the timelines and keep me consistent for every book.

    Skyward Houston signing ()
    #131 Copy

    Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

    What made you decide to take the Dark One out of the Cosmere series? You couldn't get the magic to work?

    Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

    It work a lot better once I pulled him into our world, and had the people coming to our world to assassinate him. And since I pulled something into our world, I boot it out of the cosmere. That did free up the magic to work in a different way from cosmere magic, which it is doing. It's kind of based on this idea of the narrative, that stories that people tell become real in the other world. Which could have worked in the cosmere with some Cognitive Realm things, but its working much better outside.

    Skyward Houston signing ()
    #133 Copy

    Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

    Who do I blame for killing off some of my favorite characters in the last book of Wheel of Time? You, or Robert Jordan?

    Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

    Actually, there are three people to blame. I chose about a third of them. Robert Jordan chose about a third of them. And Harriet, his wife, chose about a third of them. So you can blame all of us. She killed Bela, though. I tried to make Bela live. I know. I tried. I worked very hard.

    Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

    Who killed Egwene?

    Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

    Harriet has asked me not to reveal that one. Egwene, Gawyn, and some of the others.

    Skyward Houston signing ()
    #134 Copy

    Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

    How do you come up with your names? 'Cause there are some really cool ones, and there are average ones?

    Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

    It depends on the book. Sometimes, I want a name that's gonna feel a little average, because I want to create a sense of relatability to the characters and the setting. And other places, I want to create kind of a sense of alienness. And it just kind of depends on the book that I'm working on.

    Skyward Houston signing ()
    #136 Copy

    Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

    In this book [Skyward], you have a little bit of telepathy and teleportation. So, was that magic?

    Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

    Yes, absolutely.

    Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

    So it's fantasy and sci-fi?

    Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

    What it is is, sci-fi trappings. But my science in this is pure magic.

    Skyward Houston signing ()
    #137 Copy

    Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

    Where did Wayne come from? Who is he modeled after?

    Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

    He is not modeled after anyone specific. He came from me wanting to write a character who changed his personality based on the hat he wore. Like, literal, a person who wears lots of hats. I started a short story with him as the main character, and I found he needed someone to play off of, and that's where Alloy of Law came from.

    Skyward Houston signing ()
    #139 Copy

    Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

    So when you were in Houston about a month ago, was it for research for future issues of Skyward?

    Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

    Yep. And I needed some help on certain things. It was super helpful, particularly going in and talking to the pilots. Like, astronaut, very cool. But talking to them about in-atmosphere flying and things like that was really handy.

    Skyward Houston signing ()
    #140 Copy

    Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

    Did you know Hurl's fate before you started writing it all?

    Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

    Yes, I built that all out in the outline. I needed somebody who was the image of Spensa who went the wrong way, as kind of like a model for what she would see herself in. And part of the inspiration for Skyward is Top Gun, which has that as a major theme. So it was a very natural sort of thing to weave into the story as I was going.

    Skyward Houston signing ()
    #142 Copy

    Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

    As a normal everyday human being, how cool is it that you have a secret lair and a symphony dedicated to one of your book series?

    Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

    It is really cool. Very, very, surreal at times, the life that I live.

    Skyward Houston signing ()
    #143 Copy

    Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

    Why did he set the kitchen on fire?

    Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

    He didn't intend to. It just kind of happened. That sort of thing just kind of happens sometimes. It's based off of my cousin, who accidentally set the kitchen on fire making a burrito. He started his kitchen on fire because of a flaming burrito. Be careful when you're cooking your burritos.

    Skyward Houston signing ()
    #144 Copy

    Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

    Why didn't Spensa just go home to get food, instead of just having to hunt?

    Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

    Well, there's a couple of reasons. Number one, she's kind of independent and strong-headed, and doesn't want to admit that she can't do it. And number two, she needed that time to work on M-Bot. If she were going down and coming back up, she wouldn't have the time. But she would set snares for rats, which she checked in the off-time, which meant that it saved her a lot of time eating only rats.

    Skyward Houston signing ()
    #146 Copy

    Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

    The excerpt that you read today [from Way of Kings Prime], is that available online anywhere?

    Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

    I will put it online with my State of the Sanderson, how about that? I'm sure there are versions of it on the 17th Shard, if you go look at the fan forum. I'm sure someone has posted it.

    Skyward Houston signing ()
    #150 Copy

    Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

    A lot of filmmakers and authors that have ended up producing not-great work. A lot of times, they'll cite the publishing house, they'll cite the studios, things like that, and they pressure that they get to release earlier than they initially wanted to. How have you managed that relationship with your publishers to effectively make sure that all of your books have met at least your criteria for excellence? And certainly your fans seem to enjoy them. How do you work that?

    Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

    It is a balancing, because there is a business side to this. Writers don't get as much push as filmmakers do, because no one has invested $200 million into me making a book, right? And recently, I have moved my contracts away from advances and more to kind of just being a cooperative publishing deal with the publisher, kind of with the understanding that they don't get to give me deadlines. I write the book and I turn it in, and I'm able to do this because they trust me to actually write the books and turn them in.

    And so, it is a balancing act, though, in a different way. I've never really felt pressure from the publisher. But at the same time, there's that famous quote, "Art is never finished; it's only ever abandoned." You can always do another revision. And where to stop your revision is something that I think each author kind of has to come to terms with. Because if the book were released a year later, it would be a different book. It may not be better; it might be better. It may just be different. So learning to balance that, to know when you're done with revisions and things like this, I think is certainly a part of it. It isn't a big problem for me.

    Words of Radiance is the closest it came to being a problem. Because we had the publication date set, and then the revisions just took longer than we expected. And my core assistant, who was doing copyedits, was spending way too long on those copyedits. We've tried to learn to balance that. But it's something that authors have to learn to balance, so good question. I'm not sure I have a straight answer for you on it, though.