MisCon 2018

Event details
Name
Pending review
Name MisCon 2018
Date
Date May 26, 2018
Location
Location Missoula, MT
Entries
Entries 55
This event is pending review from Dragonsteel Entertainment. There may be some errors in how questions were answered.
Upload sources
#1 Copy

coltonx9 [PENDING REVIEW]

Will we be seeing more of Axies the Collector?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Yes, but briefly. Axies probably won't get another... Maybe there'll be another interlude from Axies' viewpoint. Maybe. He's just around to have fun.

#2 Copy

NotarySojac [PENDING REVIEW]

If you store one type of Investiture in a nicrosil mind, for example, if you store Stormlight, could you retrieve it as another type?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

It's...possible. *inaudible* It's not quite as simple as you might think.

#3 Copy

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

Was Syl starting to bond with Tien before he died?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

No, good question. But Tien was starting to bond a different spren.

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

I was suspecting that he was bonding a spren, but then Syl says, at one point, just as she was coming over *inaudible* so I was like, maybe!

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Good question, but no, he was going in a different direction.

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

Can you tell me...?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Lightweaver.

#4 Copy

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

*inaudible* also storing stormlight. Did you decide the value of the gems first?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

So I actually retrofitted it. What we looked at is how much food does it create, how much is that equivalency in our world, what factors do we need to change. And we retrofitted how much things were worth. There's also a measurement in there of how much...amount of stormlight there is and how much that is worth, how much energy and work that can do.

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

*inaudible*

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

I assign other people to do a lot of that these days. I say, "Here is the situation I want, run the math on this and come back and tell me how much I may use here or there."

#5 Copy

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

I'm a geologist. I was wondering does Scadrial have tectonics the way Earth does?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Yes. Scadrial does have tectonics. Roshar doesn't. I think it's the only one I built that doesn't, because of some specific things. But yes, Scadrial has tectonics.

#6 Copy

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

When you're sad, would a Seon, especially when you're a kid, would it like nuzzle you and tell you nice things?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

It would definitely tell you nice things. Seons barely have any weight to them, and touch, and so nuzzling is not a natural instinct, I would say, for them. But they will definitely comfort you.

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

Okay. So they're not born?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

No, not really anymore. They were all created kind of around the same point.

#7 Copy

Jess [PENDING REVIEW]

The Cognitive aspect of an object is the way that the object itself and others view it. Say the Vessel of a Shard started to view their power in a somewhat different way than when they first got that power, and the people on the planet also start to view it that way. Would the intent/mandate of that Shard be altered by that changes?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Within some limitations, yes. Certain Shards--certain Vessels believe it can go further than others believe it can go. But there is at least some wiggle room there.

#8 Copy

Jess [PENDING REVIEW]

Can we get a small, just a small tidbit or a reveal of what Marasi is going to be doing in The Lost Metal?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

So, opening scene of The Lost Metal is her and Wayne. It's a couple of years later and Wax is basically retired to [a thing] and Wayne is her deputy now instead, mainly so she can keep him channeled in the right direction.

Footnote: Jess believes that Brandon meant to say "Wax is basically retired from that sort of thing."
#9 Copy

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

Is there a feminine Alethi nickname that means gift or blessing?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Yes, but I'd have to go look at the dictionary.

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

Is the dictionary purchasable?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

No, but if you email me, we can hunt through it and see what we can find.

#10 Copy

Chaos [PENDING REVIEW]

At JordanCon, you said that Gavilar's black sphere was something that..."It's what you expect it to be." Does that mean it's holding an Unmade?

Brandon [PENDING REVIEW]

Not necessarily. Voidlight can be trapped like Stormlight can. Unmade can be trapped like spren can. Does not mean that the sphere has an Unmade.

#11 Copy

Chaos [PENDING REVIEW]

Do you need a perfect gemstone to imprison an Unmade or a powerful spren?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Yeah. Well...the stronger the spren, the better the gemstone needs to be. Those flaws in the crystal structure are going to lead to leaking if it's not. But an Unmade requires an extra-special level of perfection.

#12 Copy

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

Did the Aimians want Aimia to be scoured?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

No. But, doesn't mean that they--some of them may have seen what happened as necessary. But certainly that was not a prevailing thing.

#13 Copy

Chaos [PENDING REVIEW]

Is Ingenuity a Shard?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Umm...maybe. *smiles slyly*

#14 Copy

Glamdring804 [PENDING REVIEW]

With Adhesion you can use it to either create negative pressure and stick two things together, or you can manipulate to create pressure bubbles around you, like Kal did facing down the storm. Or say with Gravitation, you can do a Basic Lashing and change the direction gravity is acting on something, or you can do a Reverse Lashing and change the...and have something with its own gravity field. So I was wondering then, if that is possibly caused by Pushing and Pulling on Surges?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Yes, that is a legitimate interpretation.

#15 Copy

Jess [PENDING REVIEW]

The black glass beads in Shadesmar on Roshar. If you could somehow get that material into the Physical Realm, would it hold stormlight?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

So, that's a RAFO. Because getting stuff out of the Cognitive Realm into the Physical Realm is a different matter from taking stuff from the Physical Realm to the Cognitive.

Jess [PENDING REVIEW]

Well, you don't have to weigh in on whether they could get it to the Physical Realm...!

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Still a RAFO!

#16 Copy

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

When can we get a Herald of War perspective?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

You've gotten one really brief one. You really won't get them until starting around book six. So, you got a little bit left. Taln is a main character in the back five books, but he's only kinda just a tangential character in the first ones.

#17 Copy

Brainless [PENDING REVIEW]

How did Spook die?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

That's a RAFO. There's your card.

#18 Copy

Glamdring804 [PENDING REVIEW]

Szeth has an afterglow because his soul is lagging behind his body slightly.

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Yes.

Glamdring804 [PENDING REVIEW]

So if he was moving fast enough, could a Shardblade pass through his physical body and not cut the soul?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Ummm, that sounds like the sort of thing... I'm going to say, the soul is more stretchy, so I don't think that's possible. But you could do some weird things where you're cutting the soul and not the body.

#19 Copy

Glamdring804 [PENDING REVIEW]

If you had a spanreed, and you took one half into Shadesmar, would it still be able to write with the conjoined one in the Physical Realm?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

RAFO.

#20 Copy

Jess [PENDING REVIEW]

If a Radiant brought some infused gems into Shadesmar, could they transfer that stormlight into the black glass substance that seems to compose Shadesmar?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

I'll RAFO that one.

#21 Copy

Jess [PENDING REVIEW]

Do Rosharans store their gemstones in spheres in imitation or inspiration of the spheres in [Shadesmar]?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

No, they don't. There is a relationship there, but that's not what caused it.

#22 Copy

Brainless [PENDING REVIEW]

So if you jumped off a high place and you were a steel Feruchemist, could you store the speed of you falling?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

No, because... I'm going to say you need to be moving under your own... because otherwise it's all relative, right? If you're falling, it's no different than if you're traveling on the planet or things like that.

Glamdring804 [PENDING REVIEW]

So it's related more to muscle contractions.

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

*hesitantly* Yes.... kind of. Feruchemy bends all sorts of weird things, ever since I started doing the weight one. So, yes.

Brainless [PENDING REVIEW]

The thing about Feruchemy is it feels like you could be like a savant short of it, but it would be much more minor than something like a savant for... It would be more things like what you could get for exercise and stuff like that.

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Yeah. Yeah, that's possible.

#23 Copy

Chaos [PENDING REVIEW]

Odium said to Taravangian, "You did this without access to Fortune or the Spiritual Realm?" How does one access Fortune without the Spiritual Realm or Feruchemical chromium, as almost all future sight tends to utilize the Spiritual Realm in some way?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

So, that line is mostly just me saying... [long pause] I think you're picking apart those things too much.

Chaos [PENDING REVIEW]

Right, that makes sense. Hey, Odium said it, so I didn't know... Gotta take that seriously, so.

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

So, yeah, don't read too much into picking apart those two things. You can read it as... Honestly, that is me making sure I am being clear in the text.

Chaos [PENDING REVIEW]

That there are those are two different things.

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Yeah those are two different things, but they are just interrelated. Fortune is a property, and the Spiritual Realm is a place, but not a place. Do you know what I mean? To use Fortune, you're always involving the Spiritual Realm, but in the Spiritual Realm, you're not always involving Fortune.

#24 Copy

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

On every planet, do all the objects have the ability to know what they are and remember?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Yes, to an extent.

#25 Copy

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

On Sel, in the dialogue from Khriss, the Arcanum Unbounded, she mentions that the Cognitive Realm is especially dangerous because Devotion and Dominion were killed there. Why is it dangerous? Are there bad spren?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Well it's called the Expanse of the Densities in Roshar for a very good reason.

#26 Copy

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

Is, "Secret Project," Infinity Blade?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Secret project is not Infinity Blade. I'm sorry. Secret Project is a secret. Secret Project I cannot discuss for contractual reasons.

#27 Copy

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

Speaking of the Cosmere, because it's this multiverse that's the setting for all these different epic fantasy series, do you ever feel restricted by the Cosmere in a sense of sort of wanting to do with a plot or a magic or wanting something really epic to happen but be like, "Wait that's not legal in the system I've created?" 

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

It doesn't happen very often because, most of the times in my outlining process, I notice these things and I move something out of the Cosmere. If it's just not going to work with the Cosmere magic, it just doesn't have to be Cosmere. And I'm really glad I gave myself that freedom because I think that you can get too locked in, right? If I'm like, "Everything has to be Cosmere!" then either I'm going to break it, which is going to decrease the value of the continuity, or I'm just not going to be able to write some books that I'm excited about. And I don't like either of those options.

And so being able to say, "You know what? This magic that I'm working on for FTL does not match any of the ways that the Cosmere FTL could work. I'm going to move this out of the Cosmere." That's what happened to Skyward. Skyward was in the Cosmere for a little while, but then I moved it out. I'm like, "No this matches other stuff better. I'm going to go with this FTL, that is not a Cosmere FTL." That frees me like...

Skyward is a science fiction space opera, starship pilots and things like that. And if I would have done this in the Cosmere, I would have just had to avoid talking about things that would be spoilers for other Cosmere books, which would have been terrible, right? So either you have the Skyward books that have their hands bound so that I can't give spoilers, or Skyward gives all the spoilers, and then cool things happening in the future of the Cosmere are just like, "whatever". I take option number three, which is I'm just not going to do this as a Cosmere book because obviously it doesn't fit.

#28 Copy

Brainless [PENDING REVIEW]

If you had a chance to go back for Elantris and the early Mistborn books and stuff like that, would you potentially consider adding more crossover characters, because you did put Hoid in all of those, but would you potentially put other smaller things from other planets, like other worldhoppers, in it?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

So, the cheeky answer to this is, I've read "The Monkey's Paw", and I've read enough science fiction stories to know that if someone says "Do you want to change this thing about your past?" that you say "No." Because depending on the writer you are either going to end up in a horror story, or you are going to have to learn some lesson about how important you are, or your family is, and then it will all be a dream, so no, I wouldn't.

But really the answer is no, I wouldn't change. I like the fact that the cosmere has a very light touch on those early books. I like it in part because I feel like people who are just getting into my fiction, I don't want them to feel like they have to follow everything to enjoy one book. I'm adding little bits more into Stormlight, but that's inevitable because so much will take place in Shadesmar, which by it's nature is far more cosmere-aware, and so we're going to have to do more things the further Stormlight gets and the further Mistborn gets, because it will become inevitable. And I'm embracing that. The further we go in the cosmere, the more you're going to have to be on board for the idea of the crossovers working. But I don't want the initial books that you get into to have to be like that. I was very intentional with my light touch on those early cosmere books and I wouldn't go back and add more. Even Way of Kings has Hoid and Felt in it, and that's just about it.

Chaos [PENDING REVIEW]

Felt's in Words of Radiance.

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Oh, is he in Words of Radiance? He's not even in Way of Kings.

Several Questioners [PENDING REVIEW]

*talking over each other*

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Yeah, you saw Galladon, you saw the seventeenth shard. So there's like one scene in the whole book, maybe two, depending, but Hoid isn't even very Hoidlike in that first one. It's the second one where he mentions Adonalsium and stuff—

Several Questioners [PENDING REVIEW]

*correct the previous statement*

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Is it the first one? It's the first one. It's that party at the thing with Dalinar. So there's two scenes in Way of Kings, and that's very intentional. By the time we get to the second stage Stormlight books, and the fourth stage Mistborn books, you'll just have to be on-board. But by then you're entrenched. If you're reading Stormlight seven, then the Stormlight series is already longer than everything else, so you might as well just've read everything else.

#29 Copy

Brainless [PENDING REVIEW]

Is the Cognitive Realm on other planets called Shadesmar?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

For simplicity's sake in translation, for the most part, we are going to use the word Shadesmar, acknowledging that in some of the languages it may be a different word. But the Cosmere standard used in Silverlight and things is Shadesmar. That's just for ease of talking about it but the scholars in Silverlight they use the actual word Shadesmar. I'm going to force Eric to do some heavy lifting on some other things like this.

Chaos [PENDING REVIEW]

<Expresses that not everyone will be pleased about this WoB>

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Yeah I suspect that as we move into Era 4, Cognitive Realm might start replacing it, the more scientific term, but Shadesmar is the colloquial term. 

#30 Copy

Glamdring804 [PENDING REVIEW]

In Way of Kings, Jasnah recommends to Shallan the Devotary of Sincerity. Their motto is "There is always something more to discover." That sounds very similar to our favorite Mistborn psychopath's saying; is Kelsier connected to that at all?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

RAFO.

#31 Copy

Glamdring804 [PENDING REVIEW]

Could someone, using Investiture the right way, could a transgender person use Investiture to change their body to match...

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Yes.

#32 Copy

Glamdring804 [PENDING REVIEW]

How advanced is astronomy on Roshar? Because it's something you haven't really talked about, and I'm thinking—

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Depends on the region. Some people... the astronomy's getting moderately well.

Glamdring804 [PENDING REVIEW]

Surely they've seen Ashyn and Braize in the sky, and I'm wondering how long it will be before they start detecting signs of civilization on Ashyn.

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

That would depend on a couple of things, such as, the easiest way to detect civilization is with radio waves... so you need some good telescopes. I don't think that would be, even if they spotted it, as revolutionary as you might think it would be, because we thought there were people on all of our planets for most of the history of mankind, and it didn't really affect how we viewed cosmology. I think if you went to Roshar and asked them, they'd be like "Yeah, totally, people live on those planets. Obviously." Just like if you went back and said "Do people live on the moon?" in the 1700s, people would be like, "Yeah probably, seems like they must."

#33 Copy

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

The fandom found out about The Way of Kings pretty early on. I don't know how this happened, but Amazon put up a listing for it in like, 2006. The book was eventually published four years later. I hadn't written it in 2006. I'd written a version of it that I sent to my editor at Tor when he wanted to buy Elantris. I said, "Here's the other thing I'm working on."

And he read Way of Kings and he called me back, terrified. Because it's 400,000 words long. Well, the print version is 300,000 words. And they say, you should shoot for maybe 120,000 for your first novel. So it's big, and I had all these notes for this art I wanted to put into it. So it was going to be really expensive to print, really expensive to edit. And he called and he was like, "Uhhh can we cut this? This is enormous!"

And I'm like, "No we can't cut it but it's not right yet." So we did a contract for Elantris and Mistborn. We never had a contract for Way of Kings. I don't know how anyone found out about it, but Amazon put up a listing for it anyway.

So the fandom started putting up fake reviews for this book. And they also devised fake pictures of it. Amazon has this Show Your Version. So they printed off fake covers and put them around books and took pictures and sent them in. So eventually, Amazon just put one of their covers up as the cover. And it had a picture of Elvis on the front. It was called The Way of Kings. And it had a quote from Terry Goodkind that said "A hunka hunka burning good book!"

This is what happens when you give fans a blank space on the internet and say "Fill this!" I didn't ask them to do this by the way. They just did this. I just started looking and people were like, "This book cured my dog's cancer!" Stuff like that! You know how they are.

Footnote: The picture and fake reviews can be found here.
#34 Copy

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

How do you do the Bridge 4 Salute?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

It's very similar to the Wakanda salute. When they did that movie I'm like, "Oh no!" If we ever do get a live action thing, they'll probably have to do it differently. But I've always done it out in front. *Does the salute*

Like that.

#35 Copy

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

In your magic systems, they all require the character to go over a great stress before they obtain that *inaudible*. Do you use the concept of the price that comes with magic in a plausible magic system when you came up with that idea, or was it more about the idea of flawed characters are awesome?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

In the Cosmere magics, a lot of times in order to get the magic, there needs to be...the internal logic argument is: Souls, once they have gaps in them, those gaps can be filled with other things, which often give you access to magical powers. Great trauma or stress--this is an age old fantasy idea, goes back many many years in the genre--will let you attain some of these powers, kind of as a balancing thing and mostly this is for narrative reasons.

Flawed characters are just way more interesting to write, and I gravitated to it pretty naturally as I was building the magic of the Cosmere. And I would say it was mostly narrative reasons, as opposed to, when I was building the magic, some rule that felt like it needed to be there. But it's also a little of a balancing factor. It's trying to build into -- whoever asked the question about the god -- having god-like powers, but their flaws making it hard for them to use it.

It's a check on giving the powers to my characters, if I make sure to establish, this character has some holes in their--some gaps and flaws in who they are, that might make them use their powers wrong once they get them, and that is in some way a narrative check on that, if that makes sense.

#36 Copy

Brainless [PENDING REVIEW]

You've always said that your favorite sort of magic was being a Coinshot or being a Windrunner because you really want to fly. So I thought that Iron Feruchemy you can fly using just Iron Feruchemy. So if you had a paraglider and a place to jump off of, you're paragliding, go downwards, your momentum increases, you increase your weight when you're going downwards. You pull upward and then you decrease your weight. Your velocity will increase and you'll go up...

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

We have thought about that. I'm not sure if the math...like, we're trying to conserve momentum. We're trying to follow the math of that. So the question is, would that work? It probably would, but I'd have to look at the math. Because I tried to make very clear in the Wax and Wayne books that we conserve momentum.

Really what we're doing is, we're breaking potential energy, right, when we're doing this. Because Iron Feruchemy is just the weirdest of all of them. Because we're breaking potential energy, what you just said probably works, doesn't it.

Brainless [PENDING REVIEW]

That was in context with the thing I was saying yesterday, about Feruchemical savants. If you did that every day for years, would you potentially get to the point where you could potentially make one side of your body heavier than the other side?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

There are many people in the Cosmere who would think this idea has merit and they would want to test it.

#37 Copy

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

I sought refuge in the silent caverns. I didn’t dare go back to my mother and grandmother. My mother would undoubtedly be happy. She’d lost a husband to the Krell, and dreaded seeing me suffer the same fate. Gran Gran, she would tell me to fight. But fight what? The military itself didn’t want me. I felt like a fool. All this time, telling myself I’d become a pilot, and in truth I’d never had a chance. My teachers must have spent these years laughing at me behind their hands. I walked through an unfamiliar cavern on the outer edge of what I’d explored, hours away from Igneous. And still the feelings of embarrassment and anger shadowed me. What an idiot I had been.

I reached the edge of the subterranean cliff and knelt, activating my father’s light-line by tapping two fingers against my palm. The bracelet glowed more brightly. Gran Gran said we’d brought these with us to Detritus, that they were pieces of equipment used by the explorers and warriors of the old human space fleet. I wasn’t supposed to have one of course, but everyone thought that it had been destroyed when my father crashed. I placed my wrist against the stone of the cliff, and again tapped my fingers against my palm, an action the bracelet could sense. This command made an energy line stick to the rock, connecting my bracelet to the stone.

A three-finger tap let out more slack. Using that I could climb over the ledge, rope in hand, and lower myself to the bottom. Once down, another tap made the rope let go of the rock above then snap back into the bracelet housing. I didn’t know how it worked, only that it needed to recharge it every month or two, something I did in secret by plugging it into the power lines outside the caverns.

I crept into a cavern filled with kurdi mushrooms. They tasted foul but were edible and rats loved them. This would be prime hunting ground. So I turned off my light and settled down to wait, listening intently. I had never feared the darkness. It reminded me of the exercise Gran Gran taught, where I floated up toward the singing stars. You couldn’t fear the dark when you were a fighter. And I was a fighter.

I was, I was going, I was going to be a pilot...

I looked upward, trying to push away those feelings of loss. Instead, I was soaring. Toward the stars. And again I thought I could hear something calling to me, a sound like a distant flute. A nearby scraping pulled me back. Rat nails on stone. I raised my speargun, familiar motions guiding me, and engaging a smidgen of light from my light-line.

The rat turned in a panic toward me. My finger trembled on the trigger but I didn’t fire as it scrambled away. Why did it matter? Was I really just going to go on with my life like nothing had happened? Usually exploring kept my mind off my problems. Today they kept intruding like a rock in my shoe. Remember? Remember that your dreams have just been stolen?

I felt like I had those first days following my father’s death. When every moment, every object, every word reminded me of him and of the sudden hole inside me. I sighed, then attached one end of my light-line to my spear and commanded it to stick to the next thing it touched. I took aim at the top of another cliff and fired, sticking the weightless glowing rope in place. I climbed up, my speargun rattling in its straps on my back.

As a child I’d imagined that my father had survived his crash, that he was being held captive in these endless uncharted tunnels. I imagined saving him, like a figure from Gran Gran’s stories. Gilgamesh, or Joan of Arc, or Tarzan of Greystoke, a hero. The cavern trembled as if in outrage, and dust fell from the ceiling. An impact up on the surface. That was close, I thought. Had I climbed so far? I took out my book of hand-drawn maps. I’d been out here quite a while by now; hours at least. I had taken a nap a few caverns back.

I checked the clock on my light-line. It had passed to the next day, the day of the test, which would happen in the evening. I probably should have headed back. Mom and Gran Gran would worry if I didn’t show up for the test. To hell with the test, I thought, imagining the indignation I’d feel at being turned away at the door. Instead I climbed up through a tight squeeze into another tunnel. Out here my size was, for once, an advantage.

Another impact rocked the caverns. With this much debris falling, climbing to the surface was definitely stupid. I didn’t care. I felt reckless. I felt, almost heard, something driving me forward. I kept climbing until I finally reached a crack in the ceiling. Light shone through it, of an even, sterile type; too white, not orange enough. Cool, dry air blew in also, which was a good sign. I pushed my pack ahead of me, then squirmed through the crack and out into the light.

The surface. I looked up and saw the sky again. It never failed to take my breath away. A distant skylight shone down on a section of the land, but I was mostly in shadow. Just overhead, the sky sparkled with a shower of falling debris. Radiant lines like slashes. A formation of three scout-class starfighters flew through it, watching. Falling debris was often broken pieces of ships or other space junk, and salvage from it could be valuable. It played havoc with our sensors though, and could mask a Krell incursion.

I stood in the grey-blue dust and let the awe of the sky wash over me, feeling a particular sensation of wind against my cheeks. I’d come up close to Alta Base, which I could see in the distance, maybe only a thirty-five minute walk or so away. Now that the Krell knew where we were, there was no reason to hide the base, so it had expanded from a hidden bunker to several large buildings and a walled perimeter, antiaircraft guns, and an invisible shield to protect it from debris.

Outside that wall, groups of people worked a small strip of something I always found strange: trees and fields. What were they even doing over there? Trying to grow food in this dusty ground? I didn’t dare get close. The guards would take me for a scavenger from the distant caverns. Still, there was something dramatic about that stark green of those fields and the stubborn walls of the base. Alta was a monument to our determination. For three generations, humankind had lived like rats and nomads on this planet, but we would hide no longer.

The flight of starships streaked toward Alta, and I took a step toward them. Set your sights on something higher, my father had said. Something more grand. And where had that gotten me?

I shouldered my pack and my speargun, then hiked the other direction. I had been to a nearby passage before, and I figured with more exploring, I could connect some of my maps. Unfortunately, when I arrived, I found the passage’s mouth had collapsed completely.

I saw some debris hit the surface in the near distance, tossing up a spray of dust. I looked up and found a few smaller chunks streaking down overhead, fiery burning chunks of metal. Heading right toward me. Scud! I dashed back the way I had come. No! No! No! No! No! The air rumbled, and I could feel the heat of the approaching debris. There!

I spotted a small cavern opening in the surface, part crack, part cave mouth. I threw myself toward it, skidding and sliding inside. An enormous crash sounded behind me, and it seemed to shake the entire planet. Frantic, I engaged my light-line and slapped my hand against the stone as I fell into the churning chaos. I jerked up short, connected by the light-line to the wall, as rock chips and pebbles flew across me. The cavern trembled, then all grew still. I blinked dust from my eyes and found myself dangling by my light-line in the center of a small cavern, maybe thirty or forty feet high. I’d lost my pack somewhere, and I’d scraped up my arm pretty good.

Great, just great, Spensa. This is what throwing tantrums gets you. I groaned, my head throbbing, then tapped my fingers against my palm to let the light-line out, lowering myself to the floor. I flopped down, catching my breath. Other impacts sounded in the distance, but they dwindled. Finally, I wobbled to my feet and dusted myself off. I managed to locate the strap of my bag sticking out from some rubble nearby. I yanked it out, then checked the canteen and maps inside. They seemed okay.

My speargun was another matter. I found the handle but there was no sign of the rest. It was probably buried in that mound of rubble. I slumped down against the stone. I knew I shouldn’t go up to the surface during a debris fall. I had practically begged for this. A scrabbling sound came from nearby. A rat? I raised the handle of my gun immediately, and then felt doubly stupid. Still I forced myself to my feet, slung my pack over my shoulder, and increased the light of my bracelet. A shadow ducked away, and I followed, limping only a little. Maybe I could find another way out of here.

I raised my bracelet high, illuminating the small cavern, which had a high ceiling. My light reflected off something ahead of me. Metal? Maybe one of the water pipes? I walked toward it, and my brain took a moment to realize what I was seeing. There, nestled into the corner of the cavern, surrounded by rubble, was a starship.

#38 Copy

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

So, when you were plotting out Mistborn, did you do the whole trilogy, kind of thing?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

I did nine books when I did the plot for Mistborn. Normally how I approach plotting is: first book, I do with minimal outlining for the rest of the series. So, I'll do a pretty good outline for the first book. And then I will write that first book (and of course everything changes from the outline as you're writing it) and then I sit down and I outline the series, whatever the series is going to be, with about a page on each book. And then when it's time to write that one, I sit down and I kind of attack that outline. Usually, I'm looking for about... roughly, outline is 10,000 words for every 100,000 words of book. So, a lot of my YA outlines are 10,000 to 20,000, 15,000 words, something like that. For something big like Stormlight, we're looking at a lot more.

With Mistborn, I finished the first book, and I went to my outline and I created the spine of the three eras. (Which became four! Because I'm an epic fantasy writer.) And then I called my editor, I'm like, "Hey, this is what I want to do." And he's like, "Wow, you're ambitious."

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

Are you going to complete 'em eventually?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Yeah, I will. We're getting really close to doing the next era. So, Mistborn, if you haven't read them, there's an era of epic fantasy, there's an era of urban fantasy. (It's more like steampunk, there's a steampunk era). Then we're gonna go to a true urban fantasy, kind of 1980s level of technology. Which is gonna be really fun.

The fun thing (have I told people this before)? In the second era books, we did these newspapers, these broadsheets that we put in as art. And I always like to have some art in my books. It's gotten more and more over the years, I've had the resources to do more and more. What I want to do for Era 3, as our art things, are comics of Wax and Wayne. Like, they've become characters... So, you might wanna do a Golden Age (you comic book fans will love this), a Silver Age, and then a new dark gritty reboot. You'll have, like, a Golden Age classic-Superman sort of thing. And you'll have Silver Age, where it's just bizarre. The giant monkeys attack the city. Silver Age comics, they liked monkeys for some reason, they always put them on the covers. Then we'll do this, like, Frank Miller sort of, "Here's the reboot of the Wax and Wayne comics that happened." It's gonna be a blast, 'cause it'll be three books.

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

Sure it won't be four books?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

I don't know...

#39 Copy

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

Have you accidentally written any [books] yet?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

I haven't; I've been consumed by Secret Project, which I can't tell you about. But Secret Project is what I'm working on right now, it's on my website as Secret Project. I will be able to tell you eventually?

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

Weren't you gonna write Skyward sequels?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Skyward sequel will be my next project. Secret Project should be finished in a week or two. Then Skyward sequels. Then Wax and Wayne 4. And then Stormlight Four. That's my writing schedule.

#40 Copy

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

Any updates on movies?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

So... Hollywood is Hollywood, right? We've sold Mistborn three times now to three different groups. We've sold Legion twice.

So here's how we stand right now: the Steelheart books are still owned by Fox. Sean Levy's company, he did the Night at the Museum films, but their option lapses in July, on July 1st. They've renewed the option multiple times, to the fact that this is their last option month, and we haven't seen a screenplay. Which is not a good sign. So, I would not hold my breath that, in a month, they're going to greenlight a movie. They had a screenplay, they discarded a screenplay, they have not commissioned another screenplay. They have one month left. They could just come out and be like, "Here's a bunch of money, Brandon!" They're not gonna do that. It'll lapse in a month, most likely.

Legion has been recently purchased a couple of weeks ago. Couple months ago, actually, but by a place called Cineflix, in Canada. Legion was really hot for a while. Then Marvel made a TV show called Legion, and all the interest dried up. And then the Marvel show just kind of went away; I don't think they're doing it any more. And now suddenly everyone wants to buy Legion again. If they make a TV show, they would change the name. The Legion collection is coming out in the fall, and we still have Legion on the title, but it's called "The Many Lives of Stephen Leeds" as a subtitle.

Snapshot, my novella, came out last year, it's optioned by MGM. They have put a screenwriter on it who is doing a really good job. I'm very impressed with the work the screenwriter's doing. I'm very optimistic about that project. It's looking really good.

The Cosmere is optioned by a group called DMG. They are a primarily Chinese company who... what they do is, they finance American movies in exchange for getting the Chinese rights. So, they did this on Iron Man 3, and a couple of other films. And they have the rights until next spring. I really like DMG, it's why I sold them the Cosmere. They have been going through some changes lately, the studio exec that was on it has left the company and started a new company. And that's always a little bit of a setback. They have a screenplay for Stormlight. It came out at 250 pages, which is a 3-hour movie. Which they're like "Eh, this is too long." And it still cut out a ton, so they're now looking at television. They wanted to try the thing first, but the fact that everyone's gobbling up the television rights for fantasy properties now makes say "Ooh, maybe we should actually do a television show on this." So, really, it's gonna depend on, how does the Wheel of Time show go? How does the Witcher show go? How does the new Lord of the Rings show go? And things like that will have a big influence. Amazon's doing a prequel Lord of the Rings series about Aragorn as a ranger. The Witcher is on Netflix. It's been greenlit for about a year, so it's actually moving. And then the Wheel of Time show, just announced, didn't it? Who has that? I don't know if I can tell you, I don't know if it's been announced. The television show has been announced, I don't know if they've announced who's doing it yet. But somebody is doing a Wheel of Time television show. It's not been greenlit, but it's had a lot of good rumblings. It looks good. I can't say who it is, unless it's been announced, but I've done calls with their showrunner, who I like. They seem to be treating the property with respect. I think there's a decent chance you'll get a good Wheel of Time show now. Decent... in Hollywood, decent's still a 10% chance, right? But that's higher of a chance than any of my things look like right now, except potentially Snapshot, which I wouldn't give as high percentage, even, because it's not as far along. But I'm very impressed by how it's going.

So, there you go.

 

#41 Copy

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

The closest we ever got [to a movie] was Alcatraz vs the Evil Librarians, which was at Dreamworks Animation. And they had a really good screenplay, and they had not greenlit it, but they'd done a lot of storyboarding, they'd gotten a lot of good talent attached. And then, they decided to make The Croods instead. So, The Croods was not a bad film, I enjoyed that film, but if it could have been Alcatraz...

You can find the Alcatraz art and stuff in the Dreamworks anthology they put out, the coffee table book. There's a page on a never-materialized Brandon Sanderson movie in there.

#42 Copy

Chaos [PENDING REVIEW]

Have you seen the boombox?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

The boombox?

Chaos [PENDING REVIEW]

In White Sand Vol 1, when Kenton wakes up, there's definitely a boombox in the background, it's really funny. In the middle of the desert.

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Really?

Chaos [PENDING REVIEW]

There's also a ceiling fan and horse in Vol 2.

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Huh. Really? Why is there a boombox?

Chaos [PENDING REVIEW]

Isaac talked about it at JordanCon. He approved the line work, but the colorist thought it looked like a boombox.

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

*upon seeing the panel in question* Wow, it does look like a... not a radio, it looks more like a sound deck. It makes me wanna... see, I don't think anyone during White Sand continuity would be far enough along, otherwise that could be a cool Cosmere thing... yeah.

Well, there you are. There's a boombox. That's not canon.

#43 Copy

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

After I finished Elantris, I went back, and I wrote a book called Dragonsteel. Which was to start off the Cosmere. That was kind of it's goal, I'm like, "I'm gonna start something off." Dragonsteel is really interesting, it's a Bronze Age epic fantasy, which is fun. And it was supposed to kind of be the starting point for something. But then I couldn't sell that, I tried for years.

#44 Copy

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

Do you ever find yourself writing so much of your own work that you actually go back and look and realize you've forgotten pieces?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Oh, I have to reread, particularly in Stormlight. Yeah, absolutely. It's hardest when I get hit with questions like this, there are sometimes I get hit with a question, I'm just like, "What?" I usually just RAFO it. But it is particularly bad... if you wanna read bad answers by me, go get any of the ones where I first start answering questions in London after an 8-hour time jump. Like, I get off a plane, they set me in front of a crowd, they say "Go." Imagine signing and writing things in books while people ask you questions about complicated fiscal policy. And you have to keep writing and answer them. And those questions just... Every time I'm in London, I get back and people are like, "You said this!" I'm like, "What?" Any time I'm in Europe. The first signing, particularly, in Europe, you can find delightful questions. It took me a few hours, the last one. I did get, eventually, into the zone, and start answering questions. But that was a miserable signing all around because it was the winter in London, and it was a particularly cold winter, and they decided to put the line outside. And they'd never done this to me before at this bookstore, but the line was so big that they're like, "We're gonna run them around the block." It was a very long line, but I'm sitting here trying to answer these questions, while at the same time I'm worried, I'm like, "These fans are outside in the cold. This is not right!" And so I was stressed and jet-lagged, so some of my questions were just off the walls.

#45 Copy

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Yeah, the Patji stuff [from the OB London signing]. I mean, I maybe didn't word it the right way, but it was all right. Like, people flipped out about the wording a little too much, I think.

Chaos [PENDING REVIEW]

I'm just surprised you offered it up.

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Yeah, that's a good time to get me, because I will just start talking. But it might not be continuity. The Patji stuff... I mean, the thing is, the chances that I get to write more Sixth of the Dusk are just so slim.

Chaos [PENDING REVIEW]

I thought you were gonna do a sequel?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

I mean, I've got a sequel plotted, but I've got a sequel plotted to everything, right?

#46 Copy

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

This isn't so much a question as just something I noticed. When I first read a summary of the Deadpool movie, to trigger his powers, they basically tortured him. And as soon as I read that, I was like, "They Snapped him!"

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Now, I can't claim ownership of this. I think you will find the idea of "anguish brings powers" reaching back to the early days of the Golden Age superhero comics. And to a lot of the early 70s and 80s fantasy that I was reading and absorbing during those formative years. So, I can't take credit for that. I think it's a very common trope. And so I would not suggest that the writers of Deadpool have anything to do with it. I wouldn't think that they had read... Just because it's part of the general understanding. I mean, I bet there's a TVTropes page for it, right? They'll probably have some pithy name for it or something, "Traumatic Power Inception" or something like that, they'll have some page for it. And you can go find all the places where it came from.

#47 Copy

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

What do you feel about the role of allegory? The whole debate between Lewis and Tolkien. But connected to that, the other side of it, how do you feel about the duty of fiction to say something good, or send a message?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

So, where I fall on that is, I fall on Tolkien's side. In my own fiction, I do not want my fiction to be an allegory of anything other than "Here is how some people see the world." And I think that that is a powerful thing that fiction does, is it shows different perspectives on the same issues. I stole a quote that I swear was from Robert Jordan. I hope someone finds it one day, where said he wrote his stories to give people interesting questions. He didn't write his stories to give them answers. And I put that as a quote from one of my characters in one of my books. I haven't been able to find where Robert Jordan said that, but I swear he said it at some point. That the idea is, that I think fiction is about questions and not answers. But that doesn't mean that I don't enjoy reading Phillip Pullman, who's like, "This is an allegory for my life experience." I enjoy reading C.S. Lewis. I don't enjoy certain authors, we won't extrapolate further along that path. But there are lots of authors that have written books as allegory that I think are great books. Christmas Carol is an allegory. It's a great allegory, it's fun, but that's not how I generally write. I generally write by saying, "Who is this person? What are they passionate about?" I will look for theme in what the characters are struggling with and bring that theme out as a manifestation of the characters, but I won't go in saying "I'm gonna teach people about the nature of honor." But maybe one of the characters is really interested in the nature of honor, and so they'll talk about it.

#48 Copy

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

Do you ever feel like it can be bad if you have too many characters that have really politically or socially unhealthy perspectives?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

That is dangerous, yeah. Particularly in the hands of an inexperienced writer. It's not a reason to not do it, but I'm reminded of Save the Pearls. So, this is a well-meaning young woman who is obviously writing from a position of privilege who wrote a book about reverse racism where the black people are racist against white people. And the black people are called Coals, and the white people are called Pearls. And it is really heavy-handed and poorly done, and really is bad for the whole discussion. It is horribly, horribly racist in the way it treats black people in the book that's supposed to be about how bad racism is. And her intent was good, it's like, "Hey, let's let white people experience how it would be to be racist against people," but it just... in her hands, it's just terrible. It is dangerous to not be part of the conversation and try to say something about the conversation. To not do your leg work, and things like that.

But at the same time, as an artist, I don't feel like you should not try to have things to say. But you should maybe research a little more, things like that. What if you want to write a book where main characters are racist? They hold unpopular and unhelpful opinions, they are dead-out wrong. How can you write this without contributing to the problem? And people have different answers to this. I would go research online and see what people have said about it. I mean, Stormlight is about a bunch of racist people who don't know they're racist. They just don't know. And this is me tackling that really dangerous problem, and it is a place you can get burned by doing.

But again, I think you should do it. I think we should be having these discussions, but make sure to read first. And there are ways to go about it where you indicate, "Hey, this is part of life. And it sucks." But it is part of life, so if we pretend it's not there, then it's also doing a disservice to the discussion. So, yeah, it is something to worry about. It's definitely something to think about. It's definitely something that should inform the way you approach your writing. But be careful.

#49 Copy

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

Who's your favorite planeswalker?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Probably Elspeth. When Elspeth is dressed in armor appropriate for her personality. I have a thing about that. But I really like... I mean, it's me. I like the question knight searching for answers who thought she found them and then they turned... the moral axis was upended. That was a really cool story, to me.

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

Would you ever write any planeswalker stories?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

If I were asked by Wizards of the Coast to write a story, I would probably say yes. I've told them this, as well, that if they asked me to write a story, I would probably say yes.

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

So that's not Secret Project, either.

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

I didn't say that.

#50 Copy

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

That reminds me of a question someone asked you on the forum about memespren.

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Yes, there would totally be memespren, absolutely. I'm probably not gonna go there.

#51 Copy

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

Warbreaker. When it talks about the God King, the way he sees the world, and he talks about even a little blemish on someone's skin is so beautiful. To me, it sounds like, if you think about the love of God for Christ, that is how they would see us. Is that kind of what you were going for?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Sure, absolutely. I mean, I don't think I was thinking that when I was writing it, but certainly my Christian upbringing is going to make those things pop out in my fiction, so I would say "Yes, that's a valid interpretation." But you kind of have to look at that as reader response interpretation. Rather than "This is what the author intending," it's "This is what the author was unintentionally drawing upon." Reader response is the wrong term. Whatever the correct literary... Because reader response is that author intent does not matter. If you respond to it a certain way, that's a valid interpretation. And there's a certain thing that's like, the author's upbringing informing how they write their text. Like, it's not deconstructionalism. Historicism.

#52 Copy

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

Any of those people that you learned with, did you relate any of them with characters in some of your stories?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Yes, actually. But most of the times, I take one aspect of somebody. Like, I had a good friend named Annie who was a six-foot-one woman. And I had never thought about the problems being six foot one in our society as a woman could cause. And she talked about it a lot, it's not all who she was, but it was something that was a conflict that I had never seen. So when I wrote Elantris, I'm like, "I'm gonna use this, because it feels real, it's really interesting, it's something I'd never heard about from someone else. Plus I have a reader who can read it and tell me if I get it right." So it's not like Sarene is based on Annie. But Sarene has that one aspect of Annie that I used. And that's usually how you normally see me using people in books.

Bridge Four are all my friends, though. All of the non-main Bridge Four members who keep surviving and not getting killed, those are just my friends. Skar and Drehy and Leyten, and Peet is Peter my assistant. All my friends ended up in Bridge Four, except for Ben, who's still in my writing group, who said "No, you can't put me in."

Because that actually happened during Mistborn. I said, "Hey, Micah," who was my roommate at the time, "Your last name is DeMoux, that's a cool French-sounding name. Can I use it in a book?" He's like, "Sure. But I have to get a girl. And I have to not die. It doesn't have to be the girl. I have to be successful in my romantic inclinations." And I'm like, "Okay." So Captain Demoux got put in. Meanwhile, Ben was walking by, who was my roommate at the time, and he's like, "Put me in, but kill me in a really, really terrible way." So I did. I put him in Mistborn and killed him in a terrible way. Then he read the book, and he's like, "No, you can't use me like that." It's okay, it became a guy who dumped my sister-in-law. But there's a very gruesome death in Mistborn 2 that happens in a very... shall we say, someone who does not do well for themselves, let's just say that. And that was Ben. But he made me take him out. And then I was putting people in Stormlight, I'm like, "You don't want to be in?" He's like, "No, don't use me." I finally got away with slipping him into the Wax and Wayne books under his online name <Rick Stranger>.

#53 Copy

Questioner [PENDING REVIEW]

Are you worried if DC goes into a more gritty antihero sort of thing, it will edge out the place for Steelheart?

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

Nah. I'm not even sure Steelheart has a place. Superheroes are so played out. I don't think I would fund a Steelheart movie right now. It was really fun to write because of my superhero background; doing a superhero deconstruction like that was a lot of fun. But, I mean, I don't know if I would go see it if someone else had made it as a movie. There's so much superhero fatigue right now.

I'm not worried about that. I would rather them just make great movies. I don't need my movies to get made. I'll be excited if we ever do get some made. I mean, I'm doing my thing. I'm really having fun doing my thing, right? I don't need my thing to necessarily get to the big or small screen to...

In my dream of dreams, I get to be Stan Lee. I get to make something that people really love and that comes together in a really cool way later on. I don't necessarily want to wait as long as Stan Lee had to wait.

#54 Copy

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

We do have my cameos. They're not contractually written in, but it's understood, that in each movie, I get killed. If these things ever get made, my cameo is they have to put me in a crowd scene or have me die on-screen in an interesting way in every film. I don't necessarily have to have lines, but they have to work me in. Yeah, Wilhelm Scream, they've gotta Wilhelm Scream me. Maybe I'll work up to getting, like, how Peter Jackson died in Lord of the Rings. If you guys know, Peter Jackson gets killed in the third movie. He's one of the people from the north, or wahtever. They're on the boats, and there's a bunch of arrows, and he's like *yelling sounds* and *dying sounds*. It's really cool; he's got a great death scene.

#55 Copy

Brandon Sanderson [PENDING REVIEW]

I'm Brandon Sanderson, I write epic fantasy and young adult books of various stripes. Justin told me to tell you why I go to cons. My story goes back to, I was in high school. I was in my English class, my high school English course, and the teacher walked by and put a flyer on my desk, and he said, "I think this is for you." It had just come through his things, it was "Local Science Fiction Convention, with a student writing competition." And I had never shared my writing with anyone at that point. Never shown it to anyone. In fact, I would type stories and hide them behind the painting in my room so my mom wouldn't find them. Other high school boys are hiding other things, and I'm hiding my writing. Because I'm too embarrassed that my mom would find it.

But my teacher's like, "You should try this." "This is for you," is exactly what he said. So I submitted, and I went to my first science fiction convention. Downtown Lincoln, Nebraska. And I entered their writing convention, which I won, the student writing competition. Even though I stapled my story backward when I handed it in. Yeah, they said, "First, we thought you were trying to do some sort of avant-garde literary thing, then we realized you just stapled it backwards." Because it came out of the printer that way. But I won the student competition.

And beyond that, there... I'd always been a nerdy kid, kind of felt alone. And I went to the con, and I found a whole bunch of my people. I came home to that con. And I've been going to cons ever since. And I think they're an important part of the science fiction community. I like how much we participate in these. My editor said, "Now that you're a big author, don't get a big head. You need to go to these things, because we can't let the comic cons be the only cons. Comic cons are fine, but at comic cons you're an observer, and at a Sci Fi con you're a participant." And that is what it's about, it's about building a community. So I am here because I believe that cons build a very important community, not just for young writers, but for young nerds everywhere.

Event details
Name
Pending review
Name MisCon 2018
Date
Date May 26, 2018
Location
Location Missoula, MT
Entries
Entries 55
This event is pending review from Dragonsteel Entertainment. There may be some errors in how questions were answered.
Upload sources